10 questions to Seeing Machines

I’m expecting Seeing Machines to provide positive news and an upgrade for its 2020 financial year when it releases its full year results for 2019 on 23rd September.

However, this is no time for complacency, especially given the errors of the past under the previous management. In particular, questions have been raised about its operational costs and whether it has sufficient cashflow to avoid another raise. I hope we’ve entered a new chapter but we’ll soon know.

Unfortunately, for a few months now Seeing Machines has refused to engage with me and answer my questions. Fine.

However, it would be a shame if hard questions aren’t asked and answered by management when these results come out. To aid that transparency, here are 10 that I hope investors will be asking when the results are published.

1. Analyst Sanjay Jha at Panmure Gordon has previously stated, in a note dated 5th June, 2019 that Seeing Machines isn’t funded to breakeven. “We continue to believe the funds raised in April are not going to last 18 months as the company continues to pursue opportunities in 4 different sectors (Automotive, Fleet, Aviation, Off-road).” When do you now anticipate breakeven and will you need to raise again before then?

2. Regarding operational costs: how many people are now employed by SEE? Did operational costs increase in 2019 and by how much? How much are operational costs planned to increase in the current financial year (2020)?

3. Are you actively seeking to renegotiate the Rail contract with Progress Rail? If so, when do you expect it will be concluded?

4. Given you don’t have the cash to develop automotive, are you actively seeking a CAT-style licence deal for aviation? Do you expect it will be concluded before the calendar year end?

5. Is the monthly growth in fleet revenues sufficient to avoid any further fundraise? Can you quantify this growth?

6. Why has the relationship with Mix Telematics failed to produce much revenue? Is this likely to change in this financial year? How and why?

7. What is the number of Guardian installations you  expect to have in place by June 30, 2020. What is the monthly installation rate? Can you confirm that these are generating cash immediately? What’s the lag?

8. Re. Auto, are you now gunning for the low, mid and high end auto market?

9. Is it the case that if a budget OEM needs a cheap DMS you can provide a DMS chip with less functionality at a reduced price?

10. Are you actively working with Japanese OEMs. Have they finalised exactly how they want DMS to work? (Eg. Integrated into ADAS).

I’m far from infallible and I’m sure investors may have additional questions. Good luck to all holders!

 

The writer holds stock in Seeing Machines.

 

Panmure puts 28p price target on Seeing Machines’ auto division

In a note published on September 18th Sanjay Jha, an analyst at independent broker Panmure Gordon, reiterated his ‘Buy’ recommendation and placed a 28p price target on Seeing Machines.

The price target is lower than the 30p target he had in June but is still a remarkable endorsement by an independent analyst of the company’s domination of the global market for automative driver monitoring systems given all that has recently taken place in fleet.

In the note Jha  concluded: “We welcome the rationalisation of the Fleet business which has been a major distraction to the much larger opportunity in the Automotive sector, which saw the share price peak at 14p. Our investment case has been based almost entirely on the upside from the Automotive opportunity and continue to assume that the Fleet business has no value. Seeing Machines is in the pole position to capture at least half of the Driver Monitoring System (DMS) market with competition effectively limited to one other player (Smart Eye). With design wins with five OEMs and many more to come, we foresee a growing royalty revenue stream for many years to come.“

Endorsing the recent appointment of Jack Boyer to Chairman and the appointment of Ryan Murphy as COO, Jha commented: “These are the first steps in what we hope is a major overhaul of the Board and the executive team.”

Jha forecasts sales of A$37.6m for the 2019 financial year, rising to A$50.5m in 2020. “We estimate cash deficit of cA$5m by FY20, which arguably can be covered in debt markets. However, we also believe that the management can cut costs further particularly in Fleet engineering.”

Pointedly, he appears to have a dig at the information flow and forecasts coming out of Seeing Machines: “We note that the management expects revenues in FY19 to be approximately in line with FY18. We believe they should stop giving guidance until they have a good handle over internal information systems. In the last month, we have had two different versions of Guardian units delivered and expected to be delivered. Our forecasts, for what it’s worth, is based on Guardian data provided by the CEO today and our expectations for the Automotive sector.”

More auto wins

I’m personally confident that Seeing Machines will soon announce some huge auto wins: Toyota, FCA and Volvo. Other OEMs that I believe will fall to Seeing Machines include: Mazda, Honda, Subaru and Audi.

Indeed, in a previous note (published 19th June) Jha confirmed: “We believe that Smart Eye has been launched in first generation models of BMW, Audi and Jaguar Land Rover. At the time, Seeing Machines wasn’t allowed to bid for BMW and Audi as they were tied with Takata’s commitment to GM. However, we understand that Seeing Machines have now displaced Smart Eye in second generation BMW and we expect they will replace Smart Eye on future Audi models too. As we have highlighted previously, Seeing Machines has more robust licensing model with two offerings: Software and System on Chip (SoC), the latter allowing OEMs to deploy DMS across models more quickly and efficiently. Smart Eye doesn’t have its own silicon expertise and is heavily reliant on Aptiv to win platforms.”

The writer holds stock in Seeing Machines.