Waymo good news for Seeing Machines: part 2

Interest from US investors in Driver Monitoring is set to take off as it is becoming clear that it offers the means to prevent the deadly death toll on US roads.

Adam Jonas, Morgan Stanley’s star auto analyst, published a note on 24 March, 2021, entitled: ‘What’s on My Mind? Motor Vehicle Safety — A New ESG Frontier’.

In that note he cited a recent report from the National Safety Council (NSC) in which it detailed that despite an historic fall in miles travelled and safer vehicle designs, the number of US motor vehicle related deaths in 2020 hit a 13-year high of 42,600.

Also, according to the study, for every US road death there are 114 ‘medically consulted injuries’, resulting in nearly 4.8m vehicle-related injuries last year.

That represents a huge, avoidable cost to its society, which the NSC calculates at a staggering US$474bn, or roughly 2.2% of US GDP.

Given that cost, Jonas writes: “We believe such tragic statistics may accelerate a range of policies (at the Federal level and otherwise) that may in turn accelerate changes of key ADAS technologies in the US fleet.” He adds: “The average age of a car in the US is over 12 years, amongst the highest of any developed nation in the world. We have long discussed the potential for taypayer/policy actions to accelerate the scrapping and replacement of US vehicles.”

His takeaway is that, while there has been plenty of focus on the climate-related impact of today’s vehicle tech: “We see scope for greater attention to be paid to life-saving/ADAS/autonomous related technology.”

Fortunately, Seeing Machines is at centre of this life-saving technology and interest from US investors is clearly accelerating. 

Moreover, as more and more vehicles are driven in the US with its tech (Ford F-150 and Mach-e, as well as GM Cadillacs) interest will only grow.

Waymo

This will of course be helped by Seeing Machines publicly acknowledging its involvement and RNSing such news. For example, as Colin Barnden of Semicast Research confirmed in an article this week, it has supplied its tech to Waymo.

This blog first wrote about Seeing Machines supplying Waymo back in 2018, still it is about time we had it confirmed via an official RNS — especially given the announcement by Colin Barnden. 

Regardless, I expect Seeing Machines to be rerated imminently (not a word beloved of its investors) as more US investors and analysts realise it is not a jam tomorrow stock but a jam factory gearing up production.

The writer holds stock in Seeing Machines.

 

       

 

 

         

     

    

     

    

    

    

   

Has Airbus consortium won Aussie contract?

I woke up this morning with a hunch, luckily nothing to do with an uncomfortable mattress, due to my subconscious putting together a jigsaw puzzle that I wasn’t aware I was even attempting to construct.

I’m wondering if the next piece of news that Seeing Machines will announce is that the Airbus-led consortium, to which it belongs, has been chosen to deliver a fleet of specially adapted H145M attack helicopters to the Aussie Special Forces.

If true, It’s not earth-shattering news but would further validate the importance of its pilot monitoring technology in the aviation sector.

In time, this technology may feature in flying cars and also spacecraft. All, additional reasons why the Battle of the Titans, may be kicked off by a bid from either Qualcomm or Intel in order to dominate the automotive space.

Quite aside from the prospects of a bumper pay-day for investors, the sheer long-term potential of Seeing Machines’ technology excites me.

Personally, I’d love to read an interview with one of the founders of Seeing Machines, Tim Edwards. As one of the visionaries behind the company he is probably best suited to explain how  eventually giving robots the ability to recognise and understand human emotions is going to change our world forever. It would be quite something if he eventually shared his insights in an article or, better still, a book.

The writer holds stock in Seeing Machines

Seeing Machines bags Nio

At the Qualcomm shindig last week, it was fascinating to learn that 20 automakers have selected Snapdragon automotive cockpit, gen 3, particularly as I believe most, if not all, of them will have Seeing Machines DMS integrated into it.

I’m sure that one of them is the Nio ET7, the Chinese would be Tesla killer. You don’t have to be much of a detective to work it out as the clues are all within an easy Google. Nio is signed up with Qualcomm and has an enhanced DMS. Hmmmm does anyone know a supplier of advanced DMS that is working with Qualcomm? Answers on a postcard, please.

Fortunately, Qualcomm also supplied a photo clue last week.

Screenshot 2021-01-26 at 15.44.20

I certainly would not rule out a Qualcomm bid for Seeing Machines in the future. Its technology has applications in markets far beyond automotive that Qualcomm would love to dominate. The more Seeing Machines impresses Qualcomm (and it got a lot of respect last week), the more likely it is to want to snap it up on the cheap. Keep watching.

The writer holds stock in Seeing Machines.

Are Qualcomm and SEE climbing the Great Wall?

It appears the share price of Seeing Machines is continuing to climb in anticipation of some big announcements from Qualcomm next week.

It would appear very likely that Seeing Machines via Qualcomm has made very big strides in China.  In addition, I came across some interesting news from Japan. Here are two snippets that may hold the key to the rise.

The first is news of Great Wall Motor in China. The second is news of Japanese OEM Honda installing DMS.

I don’t have definitive proof of either but I expect more good news very soon.

The writer holds stock in Seeing Machines.

 

 

Wameja low-ball takeover by Mastercard

Well done holders of Wameja who held onto this stock and who have received a bid from Mastercard, albeit at a very low-ball price of 8p, well short of its 20p valuation from FinnCap. That is the price of holding only a minority interest, I guess.

Holders should hold on for the time being for 2 reasons:

  • 1) They won’t lose 0.5p a share as the offer price from market makers is currently 7.5p,
  • 2)  I noted the wording in the RNS today: “In the absence of a superior proposal” the bid has been accepted. There may be a slim chance Visa could come in to frustrate the process and set off a bidding war.

I hope long term holders of WJA as well as readers of my blog made some money out of this  stock, as Wameja was mentioned on Safestocks as a takeover play. However, it would be remiss of me not to acknowledge that FinnCap analyst Lorne Daniel put me onto it with his excellent analysis.

Lessons for Seeing Machines

There are lessons from this for private investors (and even management) in Seeing Machines, I believe.

Firstly, Lombard Odier, which holds 23.45% has accepted the Wameja offer. I do hope Seeing Machines is eventually taken out at a healthier premium. However, at its current price it remains vulnerable, particularly as Lombard Odier, via Volantis 1798, holds a jumbo 19.9%.

This also has lessons for holders of any share; there is an opportunity cost for holding a stock for years and years in the hope of a bumper pay day.

The writer holds stock in Wameja and Seeing Machines.

 

Marketing masterstroke milks MOU

Seeing Machines managed to raise its share price today with a masterstroke of marketing; a fluffy RNS that while looking lovely on the surface had very little in terms of actual content.

Said creation mentioned a memorandum of understanding (MOU) but provided few details as to the ‘global semiconductor company’ it was with, and no indication as to the the likely timeframe for any eventual deal nor any mention of the likely monetary value (even a range would have done) of an eventual contract.

Call me a cynic (I’m actually a realist) but when after umpteen yearly fundraises, never-ending RFQs, imminent aviation contracts that have yet to materialise, missing train contracts and umpteen launches (e.g. BDMS) and partnerships (Mix Telematics and Progress Rail) that vanish into the ether, I feel I’ve paid the high admission fee charged by the Realist Investing Club.

To be fair, I’ve witnessed a lot of shenanigans from a wide variety of stocks over the years. Possibly it has left me bitter and twisted. Moreover, most of the instances quoted above pre-date the present senior management of Seeing Machines.

I love See’s tech (as much as I understand it – that is a joke for you tech geeks out there) but am sadly cursed by an inability to sacrifice my journalist sensibilities in the pursuit of profit. Nuts, eh?

Why MOU now?

What perplexes me is this: why mention a MOU now, yet provide no details as to the party it is with, nor indicate the likely size of the eventual contract and a date by which it is likely to be signed?

Perhaps it is super smart marketing, big tease before delivering the details. If the contract is signed soon, great: get a double share price rise from one contract. I will be happy to have my lingering fears dispelled as I watch the share price rise and count my profits. 

Yet, if this proves to be part of a well-planned, pump and fundraise operation I (and many PIs) will be sorely tempted to do an El Jefe and scream: “Bring me the head of Paul McGlone” — while berating its nomad Cenkos for allowing such an RNS to be released.

In short, I’d have preferred an RNS that announced an actual contract/license deal with a monetary value attached (even a vague value range). This would have enabled the share price to sail past 5p, particularly if it put to bed any need for a further fundraise. For the record, I’d certainly not be keen to see an eventual contract announced in a month or two alongside a fundraise, in classic AIM style.

I’m saying this publicly as I hope Seeing Machines responds by soon putting my fears to rest. I want greater transparency. I want further details of this MOU. Better still, quickly provide an RNS that gives something more solid: details of a contract worth millions.

The writer holds stock in Seeing Machines

5 pillars of wisdom for Seeing Machines

I noted the latest RNS from Seeing Machines re. its new hi falutin ‘3 pillars’ strategy….if you’re going to crib a marketing strategy steal from the best; Islam and/or TE Lawrence. Well done.

Strip away the technobabble and hyperbole and it appears that Seeing Machines is providing would be customers with maximum flexibility as to how they choose to use its class-leading technology at a great price, with the option to provide over the air updates. Of course, I am not well versed in the world of BS bingo so I’ve avoided any mention of ‘deep edge’.

That’s all very fine and I look forward to numerous licence deals that remove any lingering possibility of a fundraise and share consolidation. Imminently.

5 pillars

I don’t doubt the technology, just management’s resolve to deliver for private investors. I’d therefore like Seeing Machines to build these 5 pillars of wisdom into its actions:

  1. Demonstrate that management are so convinced of its future success that they use their own cash to buy meaningful numbers of shares. Especially the CEO.
  2. Greater transparency re. RFQs, BDMS, Aviation, strategy for trucks and and yes, even trains. Silence just won’t do.
  3. A reduction in BS bingo and technobabble in comms: terms like ‘low integration pathway’ etc, etc. Explain what you mean in plain English. Australians are renowned for their plain speaking so let’s have more of it. My neural processing unit will be better able to read your RNSs if you do that.
  4. Put to bed the idea that a fundraise may be needed. Stifel in its initiation note on 21st July 2020 indicated one would be needed, stating: “Key risks to our thesis include the need to raise funds; order push outs; regulatory changes; competition; and market disruption.” (Incidentally, why isn’t this note up on the Seeing Machines website for all PIs to read?)
  5. An online webinar for the results is needed. One where investors can post questions online in real time. React did this and if a tiny company like that can do it there is no excuse for SEE not doing likewise.

I should add that I still believe this technology is great and will save many, many lives. Good luck to all those at the company. Congrats on the Mercedes S launch. 

Cenkos note

For those seelievers out there, the Cenkos (house broker) note published today provided a very positive take on the latest developments, with analyst Marc Bunce commenting: “We see the launch of Occula (TM!) as an exciting development for the company with this step change in the Seeing Machines technology expected to further the gap from its peers in benchmark testing. It is the result of significant work under the radar and the announcement demonstrates confidence in the company that it has world class technology not just in DMS but also human tracking and detection. With the added offer to license for virtually any embedded or ASIC application a Tier 2, Tier 1 or OEM can think of, Seeing Machines has brought its top tier performance into easy access and affordability for all vehicles (and locations in vehicles) as well as other applications. This will undoubtedly increase its potential market share in automotive but will also no doubt pique the interest of other technology developers and integrators. Seeing Machines is therefore opening back up from a transportation focussed technology company to a human-machine interface technology supplier which could deliver further significant value to investors which is not reflected in the current share price.”

That almost reads like a ‘come and get me’ plea. There may be takers once a few more contracts are signed.

The writer holds stock in Seeing Machines

‘Covid-19 ate my bonus’

While I’m naturally disappointed that Coronavirus has induced another revenue warning at Seeing Machines, it isn’t a great surprise. That the CEO will forgo some salary (along with others) as welll as a huge bonus seems sensible under the circumstances. Well done.

I feel for those hard working employees who have been sacrificed. Hopefully, they’ll prosper in the future.

My firm hope is that the appointment of Michael Brown (Fund Manager at Volantis 1798) to the board will act as an impetus to act in the interests of all shareholders. I’m certainly bemused that after umpteen fund raises it has taken Covid-19 to impel the board to “restructure to improve its focus on profit in the three business units’. (A bit like Boris Johnson getting plenty of PPE into hospitals and care homes after Coronavirus dies down.)

What keeps me invested here is the technology and the regulation that is driving its implementation. I firmly believe Seeing Machines will bounce back when some of the delayed contracts are announced. Until that happens I will look like a mug, of course.

Also, the launch of the Mercedes S level and the Ford F-150 (featuring SEE’s tech) this year should bring a PR boost to the company. 

For any tempted to despair, I would urge them to remember these wise words from Philip Fisher: “The stock market is filled with individuals who know the price of everything, but the value of nothing.” 

The writer holds stock in Seeing Machines

React cleans up after Covid-19

In an exclusive interview with Safestocks, Shaun Doak CEO of AIM minnow React (AIM:REAT) reveals that this specialist cleaning and decontamination company has benefitted from the high demand for its decontamination and infection control services to eliminate the virus responsible for the coronavirus.

Currently, React is carrying out Covid-19 decontamination clean-ups from everything from police vehicles to offices to manufacturing plants. “I can’t give you much detail, because it’s commercially sensitive IP, however the way we carry out our decontaminations is lot more thorough than many of our competitors, that is for sure. We do ‘before’ and ‘after’ testing to ensure we have decontaminated property to a high standard and certify swabbed areas are clear from traces of the virusWe use the correct chemicals and equip our operators beyond the standards required to ensure their health & safety. We set ourselves apart by doing things the right way.”

He continues: “Just to give you a little flavour of that, we do a lot of Covid-19 decontaminations that have already been decontaminated, allegedly, 2-3 days before. But they haven’t been done properly. The ATP-testing we apply hasn’t been done, which we do in order to certify the property as clear.

Not only have its 90 staff been working flat out to meet demand for its specialist decontamination services but he also foresees that this pandemic may alter the mindset of people as to the importance of regular deep cleaning. “We’ve all worked in offices that have never experienced a deep clean but I think that moving forwards things may be very different. I think it has to be.”

“Once lockdown is relaxed I think there will be an increased sensitivity towards hygiene in the workplace.  More specifically, there will likely be pushback from employees that won’t readily wish to go back to their place of work until the premises have been decontaminated. That may not necessarily be a Covid-19 decontamination, it may be just a deep clean. However, any incidents of property being exposed to the virus will be dealt with rapidly until such time that COVID-19 no longer remains a threat. That is certainly some of the information I am receiving from customers out there, anyway.”

Indeed, just as London bus drivers have hit out at lack of protection and are demanding that their buses are properly deep cleaned, it would be surprising if employees (especially unionised ones) across the whole of the UK don’t want to ensure premises are safe before returning to work after the lockdown. Indeed, I believe employers will wish to eliminate the risks to their employees, visitors and the business of repeat infections as a result of contaminated property.

For its part, React provides its employees the best PPE equipment available and certainly to a higher standard than your average deep cleaner, as Doak explains. “When Covid-19 reared its ugly head, people who were working on contract work for us, including  hospital work and rail sector, we went above and  beyond Public Health England and the World Health Organisation requirements to protect our staff. The reason I did that was firstly, I have a background in construction and place a heavy focus on health and safety. Secondly, we are only as good as the staff out there carrying out their job. As a brand we have a strong reputation for the excellent standard of work carried out by our staff. The last thing I wanted to do was to risk exposing them to danger in any shape or form.”

React goes after difficult work with decent margins and therefore its employees are also paid well, which certainly seems fair and makes for a well-motivated workforce. “We pay our specialist operatives well, a lot higher than most would appreciate, but we appreciate what they do is unpleasant stuff that no one else wants to do.

Beyond Covid-19

Doak is at pains to stress that React is not just a provider of Covid-19 decontamination services. “We are not just a Covid-19 clean-up company, we are a specialist deep cleaner. I believe the best out there.”

“We carry out specialist cleaning and decontamination work that other companies just don’t want to, or aren’t qualified to do. Because of that our customers value what we do and pay us appropriately. Likewise, we pay our staff well and appropriate for the specialist work they carry out.”

Thus, it gets involved in everything from deep cleaning within the healthcare sector, hospital trusts, cleaning up after road traffic accidents, picnic sites after a bank holiday, huge fly tips by the side of the road, drug dens knee-deep in needles, flea invested properties as well as train fatality clean ups for the majority of train companies. All of this takes place right across England, Scotland and Wales using its partnership/sub-contractor network.

It is also important to appreciate that the React business is divided into 2 parts: of approximately equal size of revenues; reactive cleaning services – which is supporting the deep cleaning requirements; and regular maintenance services.

What has become clear with the £500k contract in the rail sector that was won in January is that React is now able to leverage relationships that it has built up, to be a one-stop shop for a variety of complex cleaning jobs, a sort of facilities management house for specialist cleaning services. 

I therefore believe that the increase in demand for its services isn’t just a flash in the pan and that it is set to be profitable from here on in — something of a rarity for a growth stock.

This company is flying beneath the radar of most investors, both because of its tiny £3m market cap and the lack of forecasts in the market. That said, it is expected to be profitable at the interims and for the full year. As it said in a Trading Update RNS published on April 6th: “At the start of the financial year, which runs to 30 September 2020, management expectations had been for the business to move into profitability after reporting annual losses for the last four-years.  Recent trading, notably in March, has been ahead of management expectations and as result the Group is likely to have delivered a small operating profit in the six months to 31 March 2020, which puts the Group in a good position to meet or exceed management expectations for the full year.”

Another positive is that aside from CEO Shaun Doak, who appears to be doing a fine job selling the services of the company with some big contract wins recently, there appears to be a surprising amount of in-depth management expertise within this micro-cap. These include a new Financial Director and a new Operations Manager. 

In summary, React is much more than a Covid-19 play and I believe the business will continue to grow profitably. As it does, the share price should appreciate substantially. Indeed, in time, I’d hope to see a dividend.

The writer holds stock in React.